Articles

  • Disease

    Acne

    Cystic acne may occur across the upper chest as well as on the back.

    Acne is a skin condition that causes pimples or “zits.” This includes whiteheads, blackheads, and red, inflammed patches of skin (such as cysts).

  • Disease

    Acrodermatitis

    Gianotti-Crosti disease is also called acrodermatitis of childhood. These red, elevated lesions do not contain pus and can occur on the limbs, buttocks, face, and neck.

    Acrodermatitis is a childhood skin condition that may be accompanied by mild symptoms of and . It may also be associated with hepatitis B and other viral infections.

  • Disease

    Atopic dermatitis

    Atopic dermatitis is quite often seen on the cheeks of infants.  It consists of red (erythematous), scaling plaques that are diffusely scattered over the infant's body and face.

    Atopic dermatitis is a long-term (chronic) skin disorder that involves scaly and itchy rashes. Other forms of eczema include:

  • Disease

    Birthmarks - pigmented

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly thereafter. They appear commonly at the base of the spine, on the buttocks and back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with any conditions or illnesses.

    A birthmark is a skin marking that is present at birth. Birthmarks include cafe-au-lait spots, moles, and mongolian spots.

  • Disease

    Birthmarks - red

    A stork bite is a vascular lesion quite common in newborns consisting of one or more pale red patches of skin. Most often stork bites appear on the forehead, eyelids, tip of the nose, upper lip or back of the neck. They are usually gone within 18 months of birth.

    Red birthmarks are skin markings created by colored, blood vessels close to the surface of the skin. They develop before or shortly after birth.

  • Disease

    Boils

    At the base of the hair follicle are sensory nerve fibers that wrap around each hair bulb.  Bending the hair stimulates the nerve endings allowing a person to feel that the hair has been moved.  One of the main functions of hair is to act as a sensitive touch receptor.  Sebaceous glands are also associated with each hair follicle that produce an oily secretion to help condition the hair and surrounding skin.

    A boil is an infection that affects groups of hair follicles and nearby skin tissue. Related conditions include:

  • Disease

    Cherry angioma

    The skin is the largest organ of the body.  The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection.  It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.  The skin contains secretions that can kill bacteria and the pigment melanin provides a chemical pigment defense against ultraviolet light that can damage skin cells.  Another important function of the skin is body temperature regulation. When the skin is exposed to a cold temperature, the blood vessels in the dermis constrict. This allows the blood which is warm, to bypass the skin.  The skin then becomes the temperature of the cold it is exposed to.  Body heat is conserved since the blood vessels are not diverting heat to the skin anymore.  Among its many functions the skin is an incredible organ always protecting the body from external agents.

    A cherry angioma is a noncancerous (benign) skin growth made up of blood vessels.

  • Disease

    Contact dermatitis

    Poison oak rash on the arm.  Several plants produce toxins that cause skin reaction.  This is the appearance of poison oak dermatitis.  Note the typical linear streaks produced either by scratching or brushing against the plant.  (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

    Contact dermatitis is a condition in which the skin becomes red, sore, or inflamed after direct contact with a substance. There are two kinds of contact dermatitis: irritant or allergic. See also:

  • Disease

    Dyshidrotic eczema

    The skin is the largest organ of the body.  The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection.  It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.  The skin contains secretions that can kill bacteria and the pigment melanin provides a chemical pigment defense against ultraviolet light that can damage skin cells.  Another important function of the skin is body temperature regulation. When the skin is exposed to a cold temperature, the blood vessels in the dermis constrict. This allows the blood which is warm, to bypass the skin.  The skin then becomes the temperature of the cold it is exposed to.  Body heat is conserved since the blood vessels are not diverting heat to the skin anymore.  Among its many functions the skin is an incredible organ always protecting the body from external agents.

    Dyshidrotic eczema is a condition in which small blisters develop on the hands and feet. Blisters are often itchy.

  • Disease

    Ecthyma

    Ecthyma is a skin infection similar to impetigo, but more deeply invasive. Usually caused by a streptococcus infection, ecthyma goes through the outer layer (epidermis) to the deeper layer (dermis) of skin, possibly causing scars.

    Ecthyma is a skin infection similar to . It is often called deep impetigo because it occurs deep inside the skin.

  • Disease

    Epidermolysis bullosa

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red blisters (bullae) that break open, ooze, form scabs (crusts), and scar.

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of disorders in which skin blisters form after a minor injury. It is passed in families.

  • Disease

    Erysipeloid

    Erysipeloid is inflammation of the skin () due to bacteria.

  • Disease

    Folliculitis

    Folliculitis, decalvans causes scarring with hair loss (alopecia).  There are areas of "corn stalking" (grouped hairs arising within the area of alopecia), redness (erythema), crusting, and pustules.  Due to severe scarring, permanent hair loss occurs in the involved sites.

    Folliculitis is inflammation of one or more hair follicles. It can occur anywhere on the skin.

  • Disease

    Fungal nail infection

    A paronychia is an infection around the nail. Many organisms can cause a paronychia. This particular case is caused by the yeast-like organism Candida. Note the inflammation (red, swollen area) at the base of the nail and the changes that are apparent in the nail itself.

    Fungal nail infection occurs when a fungus grows in and around your fingernail or toenail.

  • Disease

    Giant congenital nevus

    Congenital nevi are present at birth and may range in size from less than one centimeter to the giant "bathing trunk" nevus, which covers a large area of the body.  Skin texture may range from normal to raised, nodular to irregular, and they are frequently darkly pigmented.    Melanomas may develop more easily in congenital nevi.

    A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy patch of skin. A congenital nevus is present at birth or appears in the first year of life. A giant congenital nevus is smaller in infants and children, but it usually continues to grow as the child grows. A giant pigmented ...

  • Disease

    Hemangioma

    This angiogram (an X-ray taken after dye has been injected into the blood stream) shows a mass of blood vessels (hemangioma) in the liver.

    A hemangioma is a buildup of blood vessels in the skin or internal organs that is not normal.

  • Disease

    Herpangina

    Structures of the throat include the esophagus, trachea, epiglottis and tonsils.

    Herpangina is a viral illness that involves ulcers and sores (lesions) inside the mouth, a sore throat, and fever. See also:

  • Disease

    Hives

    Hives are raised red welts of various size on the surface of the skin, often itchy, which come and go. Also called urticaria, hives is usually part of an allergic reaction to drugs or food. The term "dermatitis" describes an inflammatory response of the skin, caused by contact with allergens or irritants, exposure to sunlight, or by poor circulation, even stress. AVOID SCRATCHING. Scratching the rash may spread the inflammation, lead to infection and even leave scars.

    Hives are raised, often itchy, red bumps (welts) on the surface of the skin. They are usually an allergic reaction to food or medicine.

  • Disease

    Keloids

    Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries.  Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing.  Dark skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals.

    A keloids is a growth of extra scar tissue where the skin has healed after an injury.

  • Disease

    Lichen planus

    Lichen planus - close-up: Lichen planus is an intensely itchy (pruritic) inflammatory lesion of the skin. The lesions are generally violaceous (red-purple), slightly raised bumps (papules) with fine scales. The papules may run together (coalesce) to form a larger raised surface (plaque). This is a condition usually seen in adults, although it can occur in children.

    Lichen planus is a condition that forms an itchy on the skin or in the mouth.

  • Disease

    Lichen simplex chronicus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ultimately results in a rough, scratched (excoriated), thickened skin surface which may develop increased pigmentation (hyperpigmentation) as seen here on the front part of the foot, just below the leg.

    Lichen simplex chronicus is a skin condition caused by itching and scratching.

  • Disease

    Mongolian blue spots

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly thereafter. They appear commonly at the base of the spine, on the buttocks and back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with any conditions or illnesses.

    Mongolian spots are flat, blue, or blue-gray skin markings near the buttocks that commonly appear at birth or shortly thereafter. See also:

  • Disease

    Multiple lentigines syndrome

    Pectus excavatum is a condition in which the "breast bone" (sternum) appears sunken and the chest concave.  It is sometimes called  "funnel chest".  The majority of these cases are not associated with any other condition (isolated findings).  However, some syndromes include pectus excavatum.

    Multiple lentigines syndrome is an inherited disorder in which there is an increased number of lentigines (freckle-like spots) on the body.

  • Disease

    Nummular eczema

    The skin is the largest organ of the body.  The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection.  It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.  The skin contains secretions that can kill bacteria and the pigment melanin provides a chemical pigment defense against ultraviolet light that can damage skin cells.  Another important function of the skin is body temperature regulation. When the skin is exposed to a cold temperature, the blood vessels in the dermis constrict. This allows the blood which is warm, to bypass the skin.  The skin then becomes the temperature of the cold it is exposed to.  Body heat is conserved since the blood vessels are not diverting heat to the skin anymore.  Among its many functions the skin is an incredible organ always protecting the body from external agents.

    Nummular eczema is an allergy disorder in which itchy, coin-shaped spots or patches appear on the skin.

  • Disease

    Paronychia

    Paronychia is a skin infection that occurs around the nails.

  • Disease

    Port-wine stain

    Port wine stains are always present at birth. In an infant, they are flat, pink, vascular lesions. Common locations include the face and neck, but they may be present anywhere on the body. Port wine stains may appear in association with other syndromes.

    A port-wine stain is a birthmark in which swollen blood vessels create a reddish-purplish discoloration of the skin.

  • Disease

    Psoriasis

    This is a picture of a typical case of psoriasis, with small lesions on the knuckles. Note the changes in the fingernails.

    Psoriasis is a common skin condition that causes skin redness and irritation. Most people with psoriasis have thick, red skin with flaky, silver-white patches called .

  • Disease

    Ringworm

    This picture shows a skin inflammation of the fingers with multiple blisters (vesicles) caused by an allergic reaction to a fungal infection (tinea corporis). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

    Ringworm is a skin infection due to a fungus. Often, there are several patches of ringworm on your skin at once.

  • Disease

    Rosacea

    Rosacea is a condition where the area of the cheeks, nose, chin, forehead, or eyelids become inflamed. It is a chronic skin disorder that can cause redness, prominent blood vessels, swelling, or skin eruptions similar to acne. Rosacea occurs most often in fair skinned people, particularly those who blush easily. It is also more common in women.

    Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that makes your face turn red and may cause swelling and skin sores that look like .

  • Disease

    Roseola

    A thermometer is a useful aid used to measure body temperature. A thermometer is usually filled with mercury.  Mercury in the tube rises when expanded by an increase in body temperature.

    Roseola is a viral infection that commonly affects infants and young children. It involves a pinkish-red skin rash and high fever.

  • Disease

    Tinea capitis

    A fungal infection of the scalp by mold-like fungi is called tinea capitis. Tinea capitis (also called ringworm of the scalp) is a skin disorder that affects children almost exclusively. It can be persistent and very contagious. Symptoms may consist of itching, scaly, inflamed balding areas on the scalp. Oral antifungal medications are required to treat the infection.

    Tinea capitis is a fungal infection of the scalp. It is also called of the scalp. Related skin infections may be found: In a man’s beard In the groin (jock itch) Between the toes (athlete’s foot)

  • Disease

    Tinea corporis

    This picture shows a skin inflammation of the fingers with multiple blisters (vesicles) caused by an allergic reaction to a fungal infection (tinea corporis). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

    Tinea corporis is a skin infection due to fungi. It is also called of the body. Related skin fungus infections may be found: On the scalp In a man’s beard In the groin (jock itch) Between the toes

  • Disease

    Tinea versicolor

    Tinea versicolor is a superficial fungal infection common in adolescent and young adult males. This close-up view demonstrates the typical pattern of the rash.

    Tinea versicolor is a long-term (chronic) .

  • Test

    Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    A catheter (a hollow tube, often with an inflatable balloon tip) may be inserted into the urinary bladder when there is a urinary obstruction, following surgical procedures to the urethra, in unconscious patients (due to surgical anesthesia, coma, etc.), or for any other problem in which the bladder needs to be kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured.

    Catheterized specimen urine culture is a laboratory test that looks for germs in a urine sample.

  • Disease

    Xerosis

    Xerosis - close-up: Xerosis refers to abnormally dry skin or membranes, such as those found in the mouth or the conjunctiva of the eye. This picture shows a close-up of xerotic skin. Note the dry and scaly appearance.

    Xerosis is an abnormal dryness of the skin or mucus membranes.