Articles

  • Disease

    Pancreas divisum

    The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

    Pancreas divisum is a birth defect in which parts of the pancreas fail to join together. The pancreas is a long flat organ located between the stomach and spine that is involved in food digestion.

  • Disease

    Pancreatic abscess

    The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

    A pancreatic abscess is a cavity of pus within the pancreas.

  • Disease

    Pancreatic pseudocyst

    The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

    A pancreatic pseudocyst is a fluid-filled sac in the abdomen, which may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood.

  • Disease

    Peptic ulcer

    A major cause of peptic ulcer, although far less common than H.pylori or NSAIDS, is Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. A large amount of excess acid is produced in response to the overproduction of the hormone gastrin, which in turn is caused by tumors on the pancreas or duodenum. These tumors are usually malignant, must be removed and acid production suppressed to relieve the recurrence of the ulcers.

    A peptic ulcer is a defect in the lining of the stomach or the first part of the small intestine, an area called the duodenum. A peptic ulcer in the stomach is called a gastric ulcer. An ulcer in the duodenum is called a duodenal ulcer.

  • Disease

    Peritonitis - secondary

    The peritoneum is the membrane lining the abdominal cavity.

    Secondary peritonitis is an inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs. Secondary means it is due to another condition, most commonly the spread of an infection from the digestive tract.

  • Disease

    Peritonitis - spontaneous

    The peritoneum is the membrane lining the abdominal cavity.

    Peritonitis is inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs.

  • Disease

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome

    Food is swallowed and passes through the esophagus to the stomach, where the majority of digestion takes place.

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome is a condition that can occurs in people with long-term (chronic) . People with this condition have problems swallowing due to small, thin growths of tissue that partially block the upper food pipe (esophagus).

  • Disease

    Primary biliary cirrhosis

    The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver, which blocks the flow of . This obstruction damages liver cells and leads to scarring called cirrhosis.

  • Disease

    Protein-losing enteropathy

    Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein from the digestive tract or the inability of the digestive tract to absorb proteins.

  • Disease

    Pseudomembranous colitis

    The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

    Pseudomembranous colitis is infection of the large intestine (colon) with an overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria.