Articles

  • Symptoms

    Rapid shallow breathing

    The diaphragm is a thin dome-shaped muscle which separates the thoracic cavity (lungs and heart) from the abdominal cavity (intestines, stomach, liver, etc.). It is involved in respiration, drawing downward in the chest on inhalation, and pushing upward in exhalation.

    A normal breathing rate for an adult at rest is 8 to 16 breaths per minute. For an infant, a normal rate is up to 44 breaths per minute. Tachypnea is the term that your doctor uses to describe your breathing if it is too fast, especially if you have fast, shallow breathing from a lung disease or ...

  • Disease

    Respiratory acidosis

    Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

    Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially the blood, to become too acidic.

  • Disease

    Respiratory alkalosis

    Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

    Respiratory alkalosis is a condition marked by low levels of carbon dioxide in the blood due to breathing excessively. See also:

  • Disease

    Restless legs syndrome

    Superficial muscles are close to the surface of the skin. Muscles which lie closer to bone or internal organs are called deep muscles.

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a nervous system problem that causes you to feel an unstoppable urge to get up and pace or walk. You feel uncomfortable unless you move your legs. Moving stops the unpleasant feeling for a short time.

  • Disease

    Rheumatoid lung disease

    Bronchoscopy

    Rheumatoid lung disease is a group of lung problems related to . The condition can include: Blockage of the small airways (bronchiolitis obliterans) Fluid in the chest () High blood pressure in the lungs () Lumps in the lungs (nodules) Scarring ()

  • Test

    Routine sputum culture

    A sputum sample is obtained by coughing deeply and expelling the material that comes from the lungs into a sterile cup.   The sample is taken to a labarotory and placed in a medium under conditions that allow the organisms to grow.   A positive culture may identify disease-producing organisms that may help diagnose bronchitis, tuberculosis, a lung abscess, or pneumonia.

    Routine sputum culture is a test of secretions from the lungs and bronchi (tubes that carry air to the lung) to look for organisms that cause infection.

  • Test

    RSV antibody test

    Blood is drawn from a vein (venipuncture), usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected in an air-tight vial or a syringe. Preparation may vary depending on the specific test.

    RSV antibody test is a blood test that measures the levels of antibodies (immunoglobulins) that the body makes after an infection with the .