Articles

  • Disease

    Epidermolysis bullosa

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red blisters (bullae) that break open, ooze, form scabs (crusts), and scar.

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of disorders in which skin blisters form after a minor injury. It is passed down in families.

  • Disease

    Erysipeloid

    Erysipeloid is inflammation of the skin caused by bacteria.

  • Disease

    Keloids

    Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries.  Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing.  Dark skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals.

    A keloid is a growth of extra scar tissue where the skin has healed after an injury.

  • Disease

    LEOPARD syndrome

    Pectus excavatum is a condition in which the "breast bone" (sternum) appears sunken and the chest concave. It is sometimes called "funnel chest". The majority of these cases are not associated with any other condition (isolated findings). However, some genetic conditions include pectus excavatum.

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, and heart.

  • Disease

    Lichen planus

    Lichen planus - close-up: Lichen planus is an intensely itchy (pruritic) inflammatory lesion of the skin. The lesions are generally violaceous (red-purple), slightly raised bumps (papules) with fine scales. The papules may run together (coalesce) to form a larger raised surface (plaque). This is a condition usually seen in adults, although it can occur in children.

    Lichen planus is a condition that forms an itchy rash on the skin or in the mouth.

  • Disease

    Lichen simplex chronicus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ultimately results in a rough, scratched (excoriated), thickened skin surface which may develop increased pigmentation (hyperpigmentation) as seen here on the front part of the foot, just below the leg.

    Lichen simplex chronicus is a skin condition caused by chronic itching and scratching.

  • Disease

    Mongolian blue spots

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly thereafter. They appear commonly at the base of the spine, on the buttocks and back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with any conditions or illnesses.

    Mongolian spots are a kind of birthmark that are flat, blue, or blue-gray. They appear at birth or in the first few weeks of life.

  • Disease

    Nummular eczema

    The skin is the largest organ of the body.  The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection.  It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.  The skin contains secretions that can kill bacteria and the pigment melanin provides a chemical pigment defense against ultraviolet light that can damage skin cells.  Another important function of the skin is body temperature regulation. When the skin is exposed to a cold temperature, the blood vessels in the dermis constrict. This allows the blood which is warm, to bypass the skin.  The skin then becomes the temperature of the cold it is exposed to.  Body heat is conserved since the blood vessels are not diverting heat to the skin anymore.  Among its many functions the skin is an incredible organ always protecting the body from external agents.

    Nummular eczema is a dermatitis (eczema) in which itchy, coin-shaped spots or patches appear on the skin. The word nummular is Latin for “resembling coins.”

  • Disease

    Paronychia

    Paronychia is a skin infection that occurs around the nails.

  • Disease

    Port-wine stain

    Port wine stains are always present at birth. In an infant, they are flat, pink, vascular lesions. Common locations include the face and neck, but they may be present anywhere on the body. Port wine stains may appear in association with other syndromes.

    A port-wine stain is a birthmark in which swollen blood vessels create a reddish-purplish discoloration of the skin.